Jul 28

The Smallest and The Largest Homes in the World

Spread the love
  •  
  • 14
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    14
    Shares

The smallest house in the world might very well be this one at a mere 83 sq. ft. I am an advocate of voluntary simplicity (keeping things simple by choice), but I do not live in a house this small (nor do I think that I would want to). Take a look for yourself.

If all of us lived in a home this size, the entire world population (what is it now? say around seven billion?) could live in a country the size of Andorra, Vatican City, or Liechtenstein. It is physically possible, but is it desirable?

Now let’s take a quick look at the biggest house in the world (be warned – you may want to mute the volume on this one as the music is horrible).

Well, this house is just so large it is silly. I am not sure why anyone would want to live in this monstrosity. It is really gaudy and, quite truthfully, I think I would get lost in one of its bathrooms or one of its broom closets. I simply can not even dream about what the two-thirds of the world’s population that makes less that two dollars a day would think.

The interesting thing here is the complete juxtaposition of the view of “home” by the two diametrically opposed home owners. The intentionality of both of them I would guess would be to be happy with their homes. The owner of the tiny home stated clearly that she loved many things about her home in her interview; I would guess that the owner of the Godzille home (I’m guessing it’s the Sultan of Brunei or someone of equal wealth) would probably say the same thing. Money really is not the issue here; the key idea is happiness and the intentionality to seek happiness. The owner of the tiny house perhaps could have got a mortgage and moved into something a bit bigger; the owner of the palace could have gone for something a bit smaller; but neither of them did.

Froogalism to me, means making the most of what you have and because it is the smart thing to do and because you can enjoy doing it. My very first post will give you some insight if you have not already read it.

I hope both of these home owners are happy. I don’t think either home would suit me personally. I like to have room to move around, but I also like to be able to clean my place in as little time as possible. Whatever buying decision any of us makes, we have to think about whether or not this is what we really need to be happy. If it is too little or too poor quality, we will not be satisfied. If it is too grand, we also will not be satisfied because we have reached beyond our means. The key here is to truly and genuinely know yourself. Only you know what is truly best for you. Also, remember to always live within your means; debt diminishes your ability to do what you can with what you have because you always have less than what you could.

Frugal living food for thought.   Thanks for dropping by.

Please follow me on twitter!

Author: Jason Milburn Google

Frugal dad – focusing my money and energy towards happiness and the things that matter most since around 1985.

Twitter Google+  


Spread the love
  •  
  • 14
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    14
    Shares
  •  
  •  
  • 14
  •  
  •  

2 comments

  1. A great juxtaposition and catalyst for individuals to evaluate how much house is appropriate for themselves.

    • Jason on September 15, 2013 at 2:57 pm
      Author

    Thanks for taking the time to comment, James.

    It really is quite amazing how average home sizes have crept up over the years. It has really changed our perceptions about what is ‘normal’ and/or ‘desirable’. I just read recently that the average home size in the 50s was 983 sq. ft., in 2004 it was 2349 sq. ft.!. These are American figures from the National Association of Home Builders. That’s a lot of extra space to build, to pay for, to mortgage, to clean, to heat, to cool, to maintain, etc.

    You are absolutely right about people needing to evaluate how much home is appropriate for themselves. The determination of needs versus wants, of course, becomes more complicated the more that we change what ‘normal’ is. It takes a real independent thinker, a savvy frugalist if you will, to cut through all this mental clutter.

    Thanks again for your comment, James. I look forward to hearing from you again soon.

    Cheers, Jason (froogalist)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.